Doc on Deck

Preparing for, implementing crew overboard recovery

Doc on Deck

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D. 

For the last 10 years, most authorities have agreed on the main principles in preparing for, and implementing, a crew overboard recovery. The five phases of recovery are

  • establish and maintain visual contact,
  • provide flotation immediately,
  • stop the boat as soon as possible,
  • maneuver to approach the victim, and
  • effect recovery over the side.
  • All five should be done as quickly as possible.

Read More

Photo of wear and tear on a boat

Wear and Tear on Boats

By Tim Akpinar

Wear and tear can be a tricky legal issue when it comes to examining damages to a boat. It’s not so much the general concept of wear and tear that’s confusing. The notion of a boat and its machinery being worn away with use is straightforward enough. Inside an engine, piston rings wear away as they slide up and down cylinder walls. Below the waterline, propeller blades rotating at high speed wear away as a result of cavitation. Boat owners accept this basic premise.

The tricky part comes when wear and tear arises in the realm of insurance claims. Here, the concept is sometimes used as a legal defense in denying property loss claims. Here’s an example. Let’s say a boat sinks. The owner is likely to view the sinking as a single catastrophic event, which appears to be a covered loss in an insurance policy. It could seem like an open-and-shut case.

Read More

Be seen with AIS

See and be seen with AIS

Many boaters have implemented the Automatic Identification System, or AIS, on their boats. If you haven’t, let’s look at why you should consider implementing one of the best safety systems ever introduced to the boating community.

Most of us are familiar with the vessel information transmitted by AIS. Identity is the key to the system. Radar shows you a target but doesn’t tell you what or who it is. AIS provides that information and a lot more.

Read More

Building an Electric Boat Aquatron at Hales Bar

Building an Electric Boat

By Dan Fannon

F or quite some time, I’d wanted to build a boat. But what kind of boat? Would it float when it was done? Would it look more like a workbench, or would it have graceful lines?

My wife, Melissa, and I had many questions. In search of answers, we went to an annual gathering of boatbuilders in Guild, Tennessee, at Nickajack Lake on the Tennessee River, where we could talk with people who had built their own boats.

Read More

Kynoch Inlet

Sailing Kynoch Inlet, Fiordland, in British Columbia

By Steve Lorimer

Fiordland Conservancy in central British Columbia, Canada, has some of the most beautiful scenery you could ever hope to see. To get there, you must cruise several miles from the north end of Finlayson Channel to Sheep Passage and continue into Mussel Inlet or turn into Kynoch Inlet. Together the inlets comprise Fiordland, and a visit to both provides several days of anchorage alternatives.

Once in Fiordland you pass bold snow-topped mountains, rushing streams and waterfalls. In some ways it’s similar to Princess Louisa Inlet in lower British Columbia.

Read More

Mobile member search

Find squadron members with mobile member search

By Dan Bartell

Have you ever been away from home and needed to call a United States Power Squadrons member but didn’t have the person’s number in your cellphone? Or perhaps you’re having lunch at a marina, and you see a boat flying the ensign or with a squadron burgee and want to call or email to say hello. Now there’s an easy-to-use extension of the USPS Information Center that runs on your mobile device’s web browser available at usps.org/mobile.

Read More

Flash fires onboard

Preventing flash fires onboard

By Harl Porter

While most boat fires are caused by electrical problems, about 8 percent of onboard fires are flash fires caused by fuel leaks. A sudden, intense fire caused by ignition of a mixture of air and a dispersed flammable substance such as gasoline vapor, a flash fire is characterized by high temperature, short duration and a rapidly moving flame front.

Read More

P/C Read Van Zile, AP

It’s with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of Read Van Zile. Read passed on July 28, 2018, around 11 a.m. at the Brinton Woods Acute Care Center in Baltimore. He was 76. Read had no immediate family; his squadron was his family.

Read did not want a memorial service, nor did he have any charity to which to send donations. His body was cremated, and his desire was to have his ashes placed in the Chesapeake Bay.

The passing of Read  marks the end of an era in the annals of Dundalk Sail & Power Squadron. We all have lost a special person. He was one of a kind. Read absolutely loved his squadron friends and would do anything for them. This shows in the 48 merit marks that he earned over the years.

Read was a “mover and shaker” in the squadron, serving in many capacities on committees and as an instructor in the Education Department, always willing to lend a helping hand when and wherever possible. His voice on the Executive Committee was always one of reason. In 1999, he rose (reluctantly, we might add) to squadron commander, a position he had tried to avoid for many years. He felt it was his duty to accept the position for the squadron to survive.

May he rest in peace! Cdr J. Streett Broadbent

Share this story

P/D/C Paul J. Nordquist, AP

Paul J. Nordquist of Framingham died peacefully in his sleep on June 21, 2018. He was 85 years old. Born in Providence, RI, he was the son of Clarence and Mabel Nordquist and the brother of the Marshall Nordquist, Norma Finke and Wayne Nordquist. He is survived by his wife Shirley-Ann, they were married for 60 years.

A resident of Framingham for 60 years, together he and Shirley raised four daughters, Betsy Manzelli of Natick, MA; Laurie Mailman of Freedom, NH; Paula Gleason of Northfield, VT; and Kristen McCabe of South Kingstown, RI. Paul is also survived by his son-in-laws; Peter Manzelli, Bruce Mailman, John Gleason and Mike McCabe. Paul loved spending time with his eight grandchildren; Jeffrey Geissler, Kelsey Silverio, Brittany Mailman, Lacey Ricker, Eli Gleason, Hannah Gleason, McKenna McCabe, Jack McCabe; and his one great granddaughter, Bianca Silverio.

Paul was a mentor, teacher and incredible father. Paul received his BS and MS in electrical engineering from the University of Rhode Island and later served on their Engineering Advisory Council. Paul served as chief instructor in the electronics fundamentals section of the Ordnance Guided Missile School within the US Army from 1957 to 1958. He began his career at GTE in 1958 and worked there until he retired in 1993. His work at GTE often took him to Europe, Africa, Asia and South America. An avid sailor, Paul and Shirley had many happy memories on their boat with friends from the Nobscot Power Squadron and the Duxbury Cruising Club. Paul was an energetic squadron member and held many leadership positions over the years. Paul was an active member of Christ Lutheran Church in Natick, MA, for the past 60 years. He was a devoted congregant and enjoyed the lifelong friendships he had there. A Memorial Service was held on July 21 at Christ Lutheran Church in Natick, MA. In lieu of flowers, please make any donations to Christ Lutheran Church, 113 Union Street, Natick, MA 01760. For online guestbook please visit everettfuneral.com. –David F. Danehy

Published in MetroWest Daily News on July 1, 2018

Share this story

D/Lt Raymond M. Schiff, P

On July 15, 2018, Raymond M. “Ray” Schiff passed away. He was the devoted husband of Lois Schiff and the late Ruth Schiff (nee Taylor); loving father of Henita Renee Schiff, Alan H. Schiff, and Rhea Shervan; dear father-in-law of Drew Shervan; beloved brother of the late Miriam Benswanger; adoring grandfather of Avishy Fisher, Brittany R. Shervan and Jordan R. Shervan; beloved great-grandfather of Lila Rivital Fisher and Oren Max Fisher; and dear son of the late Henry and Jessie Schiff.

Services were held at SOL LEVINSON & BROS., INC., 8900 Reisterstown Road, at Mount Wilson Lane on Tuesday, July 17. Interment will be at Riverside Cemetery in Saddlebrook, New Jersey. Contributions in his memory may be sent to National Kidney Foundation of Maryland, 1301 York Road, Suite 404, Lutherville, MD 21093. –J. Streett Broadbent

Share this story