Sultana Downrigging Weekend Tall Ship and Wooden Boat Festival

Wooden boat festival lures boaters to Chestertown, Maryland

By Susan Gilbert

The Sultana Downrigging Weekend Tall Ship and Wooden Boat Festival in Chestertown, Maryland, has become a favorite fall mini-getaway for my husband and me. In 2018, we took our third trip to this charming town to view interesting ships, Chesapeake Bay work boats, beautifully preserved Chris-Craft powerboats and antique cars.

Sponsored by the Sultana Education Foundation, the festival takes place on the banks of the Chester River. Proceeds from the three-day event support the schooner Sultana. Each year Sultana takes more than 4,500 students from many Maryland ports onto the Chesapeake Bay for hands-on programs in environmental science and history.

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murphy's law

After trip to Door County, boater proves Murphy’s Law is real

By Stu Zwang

We try to go to Door County for about four days every year. We go far up into the peninsula, and I trailer our 23-foot open-bow Larson. We launch at Sister Bay, where we can go north to Washington Island, south to Egg Harbor, or west to Menominee. My goal for this cruise was to return to Washington Island, specifically Rock Island State Park, which is only accessible by boat.

We had to travel through Death’s Door, the strait between the peninsula’s tip and Washington Island. I had been to Washington Island before and had no trouble. This year, the water was calm—for the first two hours, until we could see through the passage at Gills Rock. Then the water went from calm to 3-foot whitecaps. The swells knocked our small boat off course, and water splashed into the boat.

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Ronald Glenn Wallace

Ronald Glenn Wallace, 76, a resident of Fort Myers, FL, passed away at home on June 24, 2020. Born in 1943 in Puyallup, WA, Ron grew up in Richland, WA, a town built on the Columbia River by the US government to house the scientists, engineers, and support personnel for the Hanford plutonium enrichment site’s role in the Manhattan Project’s atomic bomb production.
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America's Great Loop Part 2 Grand Rivers, KY, to Fairhope, AL

Cruising America’s Great Loop Part Two

By John Simons

Our Great Loop adventure took one year and covered 6,500 miles. We departed from Waukegan Harbor in mid-September 2015 and, after making a series of left turns, returned to Waukegan Harbor in September 2016. Our crew consisted of John and Priscilla Simons and Dale and Andy Arnold.

Hundreds of “Loopers” make this trip each year. America’s Great Loop Cruising Association conducts seminars to help Loopers prepare for the adventure.

You can read part one here.

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Woman to Woman

Make anchoring out a pleasure

By Capt. Katherine Redmond

In my opinion, anchoring out is one of the greatest pleasures of boating. Whether relaxing near the beach, rafting up with friends, or hiding out in one of the little coves that can only be reached by water, anchoring out is awesome.

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Dock on deck logo

Boating and COVID-19

By Gino Bottino, MD

As a member of the US Sailing Sports Medical committee, I have been working on plans to reopen sailing centers for sail training and Olympic sailing, as well as big boat sailing, amid the pandemic. Here are a few recommendations that can be made applicable to recreational boaters as well:

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isopropyl alcohol could prevent water-contaminated fuel

Isopropyl alcohol could prevent water-contaminated fuel

By Dave Osmolski

With the coronavirus pandemic squarely upon us this spring, boating was curtailed during the worst possible season. With marinas and public and private boat launch ramps closed, many boats languished in boatyards and driveways.

I wonder how many boat owners, like me, were faced with water in our gasoline fuel tanks. Water collects due to condensation and ethanol additives absorbing water from the atmosphere, which has been going through periods of heating and cooling.

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Kayaking on Alaska's Glacier Bay

Kayaking Glacier Bay

By Sally Stuart

The Spirit of Adventure approached the drop-off site at Skidmore Beach and ran up the beach a short distance. We crawled up over the chairs, out the window and onto the deck. The crew lowered a ladder. We climbed down and reached up for our gear and kayaks as the crew handed them down.

We waved as Spirit of Adventure backed up and pulled away. Looking at the pile of gear on the beach, we wondered if everything would fit in our kayaks. With our gear finally loaded, we squeezed in our kayaks and paddled off to Skidmore Bay to spend our first night in kayaking Glacier Bay National Park.

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Couple battles boat trouble and COVID-19

By Shelli Swaim

My husband, Jeff, drove to Las Vegas on March 15 to attend a three-day golf tournament put on by a group of friends from the central coast of California. Though social distancing was relatively new, he armed himself with hand sanitizer, a can of Lysol, disinfectant wipes and medical gloves.

Shortly after returning home, however, he developed a headache. By the next day, he had a fever. He wore an N95 mask he found in the garage to prevent infecting me. By then, he had a constant headache, fever and loss of appetite. Just three days after his symptoms began, I developed a cough and fever. Realizing we’d both contracted COVID-19, we were glad we’d been isolated at home since Jeff’s return from Las Vegas.

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National, squadrons cope with COVID-19

National, squadrons cope with COVID-19

By The Ensign staff

As the national pandemic crisis stretches on and states begin to reopen businesses and public places, finding ways to stay safe while coping with social distancing requirements continues to be important for everyone.

At the start of the crisis, United States Power Squadrons, America’s Boating Club, temporarily closed its headquarters office in Raleigh, to comply with North Carolina’s guidelines. Squadrons and districts followed similar precautions, cancelling classes and events to keep their members safe. In short order, national, district and squadrons found ways to cope with social distancing restrictions while continuing to support our members.

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Toadfish koozie

Non-tip koozie keeps drinks cool, upright

By Craig Grosby

Billed as a non-tipping can holder, the Toadfish Can Cooler uses an innovative suction-cup technology that allows it to stick to any smooth surface. When I received the can cooler, it looked like any other hard-sided koozie on the market.

The similarities ended there. The double-wall vacuum insulation keeps your beverage of choice cold for about two hours, maybe longer, depending on how long it stays in the shade—more than enough time to finish your beverage.

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