P/C Marie Lambert, AP

Marie Lambert, AP, rested in peace on Jan. 15, 2018. Marie joined Westchester Sail & Power Squadron on April 14, 1983, contributing to the squadron over the years and earning Life Member status in 2010. She was the squadron commander for the year 1991–1992. Her contributions and presence will be missed. May her memory be eternal. –Andy Papademetriou, N

Share this story

Milt Entwistle

Photo of Milt EntwistleThe Santa Clara Power Squadron, with great sadness, reports the passing of Milt Entwistle. Milt passed away on Feb. 1, 2018, just a few months after celebrating his 100th birthday in September as well as recently receiving a n award for 50 years of service from United States Power Squadrons. Milt was a very long time member of our squadron and back in 2004 was the driving force behind the beginning of the Monterey Power Squadron.  Even after forming the Monterey squadron, Milt would occasionally attend our holiday party or even some of our other events. When the Monterey Power Squadron fell on bad times and was forced to cease, Milt quickly returned to the Santa Clara Power Squadron and offered to help wherever he could.

As the commander of Santa Clara Power Squadron, I recently had the opportunity to present him with the 50 Years of Service Award, and let me tell you he was extremely proud of getting it. Milt was a knowledgeable person in a lot of areas and didn’t hesitate to share his wisdom. He will truly be missed. –Lindy Zink

Share this story

De Wayn Meek

De Wayn Meek on a boatIt is with great sadness that I report the passing of De Wayn Meek. De Wayn was a longtime member of our squadron and had served as commander of Santa Clara Power Squadron back in 1999/2000.  He also served as treasurer for many years as well as the chair of the ABC boating class.  I first met De Wayn when I agreed to assist with the ABC boating class way back in the early ’90s. Even after giving up the chair position De Wayn would still show up every session to assist with the class setup and to pass along his boating knowledge. He would always bring cookies to the class that his wife, Marlene, had baked. When our squadron first started the annual picnic, De Wayn would always get to the park early and help with cleaning the area and setting everything up. His boat, the Hummingbird, was well known within our district, and he was a regular at all the boating rendezvous.  A few years ago De Wayn sold his boat to Tim Ellenberger and assisted Tim with getting use to sailing it.

De Wayn was one of those outstanding people that everyone felt fortunate to have met. He will be greatly missed by many.  –Lindy Zink

Share this story

Frank Salzano, S

Frank, as he was known to his friends, was a Brooklyn native and married Joan Marie in 1957. They settled in Patchogue for their 58 years of marriage following his appointment to a research post at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. Joan passed in 2016. Frank is survived by his three children, Robert, Brian and Lois; his sister, Marie; and his four beloved grandchildren, Christopher, Alex, Rory and Hope; as well as a host of others to whom his loss will be keenly felt. Frank was a member of the Patchogue Bay Power Squadron since 1983. He owned a 38-foot Bayliner, which he sold to another squadron family, and had seven merit marks.

Harriette Walsh Wagner

Harriette Wagner Photo Deceased 2018

Harriette Walsh Wagner

Harriette Walsh Wagner passed away on Wednesday, Dec. 13, 2017 at Cumberland Pointe Health Campus in West Lafayette, Indiana, with family by her side.

Harriette was born in Wilmington, North Carolina, on Jan. 14, 1927, the daughter of Mamie Applewhite Walsh and Leon C. Walsh Sr. She graduated from New Hanover High School in 1944, and attended Woman’s College at the University of North Carolina in Greensboro. She married William F. (Billy) Wagner in 1950 after meeting him in the church choir, and they shared a loving marriage for 46 years.

Read More

Treating hypothermia image of snow and thermometer

Treating hypothermia

The hazards of exposure to cold on board, part 2

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D

In the last article, I discussed localized cold exposure syndromes in which a specific body part becomes cold but the rest of the body remains warmer. This article discusses generalized cold exposure, hypothermia, caused by a drop in the body’s core temperature.

Both localized and generalized cold exposure syndromes can exist in a patient at the same time, but treatment is quite different: Localized cold exposure is treated with immediate re-warming, while hypothermia must be slowly reversed.

Read More

Photo of tinned marine grade wiring for boats

Size matters with marine wiring

Troubleshooting problems with marine wiring

By Dave Osmolski

Last spring I installed a new combination sonar (depth/fish finder) and GPS on my boat, which replaced separate units. The new unit has a 7-inch screen, and the older units each had 4-inch screens, so I didn’t reduce the footprint at the helm.

I replaced the old units with the same brand and used the wiring from the old unit to power the new one. Installation went well, and I used my new unit to explore the waters around Pine Island, Florida.

Read More

Maine Windjammer Cruises schooner Mistress ready to set sail.

Cruising Penobscot Bay

Sailing Maine’s coast aboard a full crewed schooner

By David Mangold

We wanted to sail the coast of Maine but were not keen on doing a bareboat charter. Maine Windjammer Cruises made our decision to explore the evergreen-spangled islands of Penobscot Bay easy by providing us with a rustic schooner complete with captain, crew and provisions.

Read More

Photo of kayaker towing a powerboat

Not so lucky

Kayakers help boater in need

By Jon R. Evans

On July 3, my wife, Bonnie, and I, both kayakers, decided to go for a paddle on Chesapeake Bay. We are fortunate to live on Back Creek in Annapolis, Maryland, close to our community kayak rack. We gathered our gear and paddles and slid the kayaks into the water at 10:30 that morning. The day was beautiful and sunny with calm waters and a light, pleasant wind out of the west.

Read More

Photo of father helping daughter secure her life jacket.

Educational Horizons

Charting the future of United States Power Squadrons boating education

By the USPS Educational Department

The strength of United States Power Squadrons lies in its talented members and the strength of its boating educational program. To survive and thrive, we must update our courses and expand the delivery and range of our educational portfolio. Educational Department volunteers are hard at work ensuring that our curriculum responds to the wants and needs of the boating public, our members and their families. Take a look at the future of United States Power Squadrons education.
Read More

Photo of a Giant Pacific Octopus accompanying A Fish Tale.

A Fish Tale

The Big One That Got Away

By Rich Rutkowski

Sometimes it’s all right if one gets away, even if it is the “big one.” That may seem strange coming from an inveterate angler, and I wouldn’t say it if I hadn’t been there on that August day in 2001.

The day dawned calm and still with a chilled-apple crispness in the air. Winter Harbour, located at the northern end of Vancouver Island, British Columbia, is generally a serene place, and that morning was no exception.

Read More

Photo of Sails 2.0 author's sailboat Principia

Sails 2.0

New sails breathe new life into an old sailboat

By Jeffrey Taylor

I replaced the jib on Principia a couple years ago and had the mainsail made to order just last year. The old sails had big, fat, blown-out bellies and, at over 10 years old, were long in the tooth for Dacron sails.

Before replacing the sails, I didn’t know my boat was behaving badly because I had no idea how sweetly it could sail with nice, crisp, new sails. The old sails weren’t so bad in a light breeze, but if the wind picked up, they dragged the boat so far over on its ear that Principia was in danger of rounding up and behaved like a pig going to windward.

After getting the new jib, the improvement was so great that even with the old mainsail I could hardly believe it was the same boat. I hadn’t planned on replacing the main until Principia got caught out in a violent, intense thunderstorm at the beginning of the season. I rolled up the new jib before the first 45-knot gust hit, but the storm tore the old mainsail to shreds.

Read More