Priscilla “Polly” Jones Woods

Priscilla “Polly” Jones Woods of Westbrook, Connecticut, died peacefully on Saturday, July 27, with family by her side. Polly was born on Valentine’s Day in 1930 and was the beloved wife of her husband Robert Woods for 70 years. She graduated from New Britain High School in 1947 and attended Wheelock College in Boston. As a swimming instructor she was a pioneer in teaching swimming to those with special needs and also teaching infants to swim. She had a lifetime association with the YMCA and was a Water Safety Instructor and a Master Swimmer. Polly taught a Water Aerobics Class at Essex Meadows and worked extensively with Sarah Inc., which helps families raising children and adult family members with intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities or special healthcare needs. Providing them with coaching, assistance and encouragement, she brought joy and smiles of success to her students in the water, many of whom had difficulties on land. She also was a volunteer at Red Cross Blood Drives. She and Bob were very active members of America’s Boating Club with Polly rising to the rank of District 1 Lieutenant Commander. Polly loved swimming, boating, and the beach and passed that love on to her whole family. Her caring and giving ways will be forever missed.

Polly Woods

Polly Woods

Polly met the love of her life one summer at Grove Beach Point in Westbrook. That romance, which started as teenagers, lasted over 70 years. She married Bob when he was serving in the Army during the Korean War. They settled in Plainville where the raised their four children together, but still summered at Grove Beach Point or on their boat.

She is survived by her husband Robert Woods of Westbrook, her two sisters Natalie Neri of Niantic and Constance Peck of Madison. Her daughter Dianne Bronkie of East Berlin, her son Gary Woods and his wife Shelley of Deep River, Laura Woods of Westbrook, and Gail Sartori of Burlington, Ct. Polly’s grandchildren who she loved dearly are Jenifer Mongillo and her husband Jeff, Myshel Enman and her husband Garrett, Jaime Petillo and her husband Jeff, Jessica Sartori, Nick Sartori and his wife Jacilyn. The Great Grandchildren who will be missing her are Addison, Rocco, Ryan, Anna, Joseph, Dominic and Calina. And of course, her two beautiful Golden Retrievers Kate and Cooper, who were always by her side.

She is pre-deceased by her sister Barbara Jones Kellam and her loving parents Milton and Edith Jones of New Britain. A special thank you to everyone at The Shoreline of Clinton for the loving and compassionate care they bestowed on Polly.

Share this story

Dock on deck logo

Emergency room afloat, part 2

The day sailor’s first-aid kit


By Gino Bottino, M.D.

In the last issue, we discussed “time to professional medical help” as the single most important variable in determining the extent of medical supplies and training needed aboard.

Accordingly, we divided the theoretical “complete medical chest” into smaller kits based on boating needs. The simplest of these is the day or deck kit, where medical help is available in less than 30 minutes.

Read More

Woman to Woman

Develop your docking muscles

By Katherine Redmond

In my next few articles, I’ll share information as though you have just completed your boating safety class and are gathering on-land, theoretical knowledge of the docking process.

Most boaters would agree that docking a boat is the most difficult maneuver in the sport. It’s amazing to watch adventurers who have crossed oceans become uncomfortable when docking their vessels. If we are to become proficient at docking, we should learn all that we can about the task through on-land lessons and on-the-water skill drills.

Read More

Kill Switch

Must-have devices that could save your life

By Dave Osmolski

I have just returned home after spending a few weeks at my “homemade tropical paradise” in Flamingo Bay, Florida, where I can boat, fish, swim and enjoy some of the best shelling in the U.S. I keep my boat in my backyard, so I can be off and running in a jiffy.

During this trip, I learned of a boater who died in an avoidable boating accident, the second boating accident fatality in the area in a few years. Both fatalities could have been avoided had the proper safety procedures been followed.

Read More

Cracked hose

Check your engine for cracked hoses

By Nick Ledbetter

Every good captain conducts an engine check before departing on a cruise. I have diligently conducted engine checks on my boat for years, always before a cruise and sometimes when I’m just messing around in my boat.

This check was much easier on my trailerable runabout where I could just pop the cover and quickly see every angle of the entire engine. It’s a bigger job on HoloHolo where I have to get down into the engine compartments and crawl around the front, back, top and bottom to get to the dipsticks, belts, hoses and other checkable parts. Getting through the checklist is literally a pain in the knees and elbows.

Read More

Exploring the overlooked anchorage of Polkinghorne Islands

By Steve Lorimer

On several trips to northern British Columbia or southeastern Alaska, I’d noticed the Polkinghorne Islands just west of Wells Passage. We’d passed these islands in deep fog without seeing them a number of times, but in summer 2016 I vowed that it was time for a visit.

None of the guidebooks mentioned the islands as a safe anchorage, but when talking with Billy Proctor, an old-time commercial fisherman, environmentalist and year-round resident of Echo Bay, he mentioned anchoring there while salmon fishing in nearby waters. That did it! He had confirmed what I had speculated, and as we left Sullivan Bay in the Broughton Islands, we headed for the Polkinghornes.

Read More

Dock on deck logo

Emergency room afloat

The medical kit and  the conscientious boater, Part I

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D.

The realization

When I started this column, I wanted to write about putting together a complete medical kit. The more I thought about the idea, the more I realized how complicated the task would be.

First, you have to keep the size manageable while making it reasonably complete. This becomes difficult when you consider that everyone boats in different venues, at different times of the year and in different climates with different groups of people, all of whom have individual needs.

After much consideration, I broke the topic into two segments: on-board medical kits for groups with an organizer and staff, and kits for those traveling alone.

Read More

Woman to Woman

Harrowing docking experience

By Capt. Katherine Redmond

My favorite story revolves around an experience my husband and I had while travelling on the Intracoastal Waterway in our first powerboat during our first live-aboard experience. (We had previously been sailors.) Having no experience with powerboats and after spending three weeks in a V-berth on our friend’s sailboat, we bought what should have been a houseboat. It had a full-size refrigerator and stove and a large bathtub! It also had a single inboard engine (which, in my opinion, is the most difficult to control, especially in reverse), a shallow keel, and was so top-heavy that a sneeze could cause its 46-foot frame to heel precariously.

Read More

DIY trailering device

DIY trailering device makes hitching easy

By Dave Osmolski

Boating is back in full swing! That means hitching up the trailer and taking the boat to the launch ramp. Sometimes hitching up the trailer isn’t all that happens. I have completely redecorated my vehicle’s license plate while hitching up my trailer. When I had a tow vehicle with a steel bumper, this didn’t bother me so much. The unique license plate helped me positively identify my vehicle in large parking lots. I have a plastic bumper now, and those near misses don’t enhance the resale value of my vehicle so much.

Read More

Ontario's North Channel

Friends take a charter of Ontario’s North Channel

By Jerry Major

After several years of enjoyable sailing trips to Ontario’s North Channel aboard Major Dad II, my 26-year-old 27-foot O’Day 272, my fascination with the surrounding natural beauty and serenity has not diminished. However, my cruising buddies, brothers Steve and Howard Anderson, and I discovered an exciting alternative to sailing my boat on the long trek from Toledo Beach Marina on Lake Erie near Monroe, Michigan, to Manitoulin Island in the North Channel.

Read More

Sailors tow stranded boat to safety

Sailors tow stranded boat to safety

By Evy Dudey, with help from Mark Glidden

After a grueling week of family emergencies, my husband, Mark, and I decided to go out on a Sunday for a late afternoon sail to enjoy the summer weather and have some time to ourselves. Along with our little dog Sprout, we boarded our 1970 27-foot Coronado sailboat, BRSRK, and headed south out of Everett’s central marina in the Snohomish River, with Jetty Island to our west. Because of the time of day, everyone else was headed back into the marina. I remarked to Mark, “Looks like the fleet is coming in!”

Read More