What to do after you run aground

By John Schwab

Despite all efforts to stay off shoals, sandbars or rocks, groundings happen. It’s said there are three types of skippers: Those who have run aground, those who will run aground, and those who have but will never admit it. Every boater should prepare for the inevitable grounding.

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Wind woes

Heed weather reports on the water

By Steve Rank

The National Weather Service issued a storm warning for damaging winds and hail approaching on a line from Menominee, Michigan, to Door County, Wisconsin, around 2 p.m. on Aug. 9, 2015.

Despite the signs of ominous weather, one of our guests, Andrew, decided to take his 6-year-old daughter about 300 feet off our breakwater to practice casting.

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The Galapagos of North America

Sailing Channel Islands National Park

The Galapagos of North America

By Keith Dahlin

For over a year, my family and I have been sailing Steadfast, our Spindrift 43, out of Channel Islands Harbor in Ventura County, California. Eleven miles west of the harbor, a two- to three-hour sail, lies Anacapa Island. Beyond Anacapa sit three larger islands: Santa Cruz, Santa Rosa and San Miguel. These islands, along with Santa Barbara Island to the south, make up the Channel Islands National Park and Marine Sanctuary.

Called the Galapagos of North America for their unique natural history, these islands also have a cultural history that spans at least 13,000 years. Local anthropologist Phil Orr discovered the 13,000-year-old remains of “Arlington Springs Man” on Santa Rosa Island in 1959. Perhaps the oldest dated human remains in North America, Arlington Springs Man supports the theory that the first immigrants to North America migrated along the Pacific coast from Siberia and Alaska using boats to inhabit the Channel Islands.

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P/D/C Llad Phillips, SN

On Aug. 20, 2017, Llad Phillips, 82, husband, father, grandfather, good friend, professor of economics, avid sailor, and connoisseur of fine wine, aged scotch and excellent tequila, passed away. Llad was born to Schuyler and Onita (Stone) Phillips on Feb. 25, 1935, in McCool Junction, Nebraska, a town settled by his pioneer ancestors. Llad moved to southeast California in the 1940s, ultimately settling down at the ranch where his father was born in Perris, California, and graduating from the same high school his father attended.

After obtaining a degree in nuclear chemistry from UC Berkeley, Llad joined Glenn Seaborg’s lab at UC Berkeley’s Radiation Laboratory, where he worked on the discovery of radioactive isotopes. Perhaps impacted by the electricity of their discoveries at the Rad Lab, Llad fell in love with his colleague, Carolann Rose Rossi, whom he married on June 28, 1958, and with whom he shared 59 years of marriage before her passing in 2016.

Ever open to the next adventure, Llad obtained his doctorate in economics from Harvard University in 1969. Upon graduation, he spent his entire academic career in the Economics Department at the University of California, Santa Barbara. While at UCSB, he published widely on the economics of crime and justice, deterrence, and population demographics with Harold L. Votey Jr. and William S. Comanor, his long-time colleagues and best of friends. In addition to his academic work, Llad served as chair of the Economics Department and provost of the College of Letters of Arts and Science, and co-founded the UCSB Economic Forecast Project.

A great lover of nature and the outdoors, Llad could often be found hiking in the hills above Santa Barbara, backpacking the High Sierras, kayaking and sailing the Pacific Ocean, and experiencing the wonders of the National Parks. In his last week of life, Llad fulfilled his life dream to visit Glacier Bay in Alaska. His family and friends will remember him for his deep love of opera and mariachi bands. Upon retirement, Llad joined the Santa Barbara Sail & Power Squadron, where he served as squadron and district commander.

Llad is survived by his three daughters: Jacqueline Smith, Sharon Phillips and Colleen Phillips, and their spouses; his seven grandchildren: Brian, Sarah, Kyle, Declan, Kieren, Phelan and Gabriel; and his many friends and fellow adventurers.

In lieu of flowers, the family asks that donations be made to Stanford University with a note that they’re in memory of Llad Phillips to support Dr. Gregory Heestand’s Research Fund in the School of Medicine.

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August 2017

Star calendar August 2017

1 Aug    Magnitude 0.96 Antares, the heart of the Scorpion, is less than 1 fist-width below the moon low in the south at dusk. Magnitude 0.3 Saturn is 1½ fist-widths to the lower left.

2 Aug    Saturn is less than 2 finger-widths to the moon’s lower left. The moon is at apogee, 63.51 Earth-radii away.

6 Aug    Rising a half hour before sunset, the moon forms a straight line with Altair, nearly 3 fist-widths above the moon, and Vega, another 3 fist-widths beyond Altair. These stars make up two-thirds of the Summer Triangle. The last star, Deneb, is about 2 fist-widths to Altair’s lower left.

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Marcia Rowland

Past Commander Marcia Rowland, JN, was a life member and Commander of Santa Barbara Sail & Power Squadron from 2013 to 2015. She passed away at home, surrounded by family on June 13, 2017. She is survived by her husband, Dick, and two daughters.

Marcia will be remembered for her leadership and command, and SBSPS benefited greatly from her contributions. In addition to holding leadership positions, Marcia was a popular course instructor, including Basic Boating, Seamanship and Cruise Planning. Besides her work on behalf of the squadron, Marcia was a well-respected loan officer in a local bank and, in later years, a volunteer at Sansum Clinic’s Information Desk.

Marcia had a passion for the water. She was a competitive swimmer and three-time winner of the Women’s National Spearfishing Championship. She loved sailing with Dick on Westwind, their 34-foot Islander.
She will be missed but not forgotten.

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Total solar eclipse to throw shade on U.S.

By Arnold Medalen

Nature’s most dramatic phenomenon—a total solar eclipse—occurs on Aug. 21, 2017. The last total solar eclipse visible in the continental United States occurred on Feb. 26, 1979, nearly four decades ago. The last solar eclipse with totality visible across the continental U.S. occurred 99 years ago.

Totality covers a 70-mile-wide path, making landfall on the northern Oregon coast at about 10:15 a.m. PDT and moving offshore in South Carolina at 2:48 p.m. EDT. The longest duration of totality will be 2 minutes 40.2 seconds in southern Illinois, near Carbondale.

The beginning of the eclipse, called “first contact,” starts more than an hour before totality when the moon’s edge first appears to touch the sun’s edge. “Second contact” occurs when the moon just covers the sun, which lasts until the sun begins to uncover at “third contact.” At “fourth contact,” the last portion of the sun is uncovered, and the eclipse is over.

To see if your location will be in the path of totality, important safety information and much more, visit eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

Don’t despair if you’re not in the path of totality. The continental U.S. will see at least a 55 percent eclipse, which is an experience you’ll always remember.

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Star calendar July 2017

Star calendar July 2017

1 Jul    Jupiter is less than 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right at sunset. Spica is 3 finger-widths to the lower left. Arcturus is 2½ fist-widths above the moon.

3 Jul    Earth is at aphelion, 1.01668 AU from the sun.

5 Jul    At dusk, Antares is less than 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right, and Saturn is a little more than 1 fist-width to the lower left.

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