August 2017

Star calendar August 2017

1 Aug    Magnitude 0.96 Antares, the heart of the Scorpion, is less than 1 fist-width below the moon low in the south at dusk. Magnitude 0.3 Saturn is 1½ fist-widths to the lower left.

2 Aug    Saturn is less than 2 finger-widths to the moon’s lower left. The moon is at apogee, 63.51 Earth-radii away.

6 Aug    Rising a half hour before sunset, the moon forms a straight line with Altair, nearly 3 fist-widths above the moon, and Vega, another 3 fist-widths beyond Altair. These stars make up two-thirds of the Summer Triangle. The last star, Deneb, is about 2 fist-widths to Altair’s lower left.

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Marcia Rowland

Past Commander Marcia Rowland, JN, was a life member and Commander of Santa Barbara Sail & Power Squadron from 2013 to 2015. She passed away at home, surrounded by family on June 13, 2017. She is survived by her husband, Dick, and two daughters.

Marcia will be remembered for her leadership and command, and SBSPS benefited greatly from her contributions. In addition to holding leadership positions, Marcia was a popular course instructor, including Basic Boating, Seamanship and Cruise Planning. Besides her work on behalf of the squadron, Marcia was a well-respected loan officer in a local bank and, in later years, a volunteer at Sansum Clinic’s Information Desk.

Marcia had a passion for the water. She was a competitive swimmer and three-time winner of the Women’s National Spearfishing Championship. She loved sailing with Dick on Westwind, their 34-foot Islander.
She will be missed but not forgotten.

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Total solar eclipse to throw shade on U.S.

By Arnold Medalen

Nature’s most dramatic phenomenon—a total solar eclipse—occurs on Aug. 21, 2017. The last total solar eclipse visible in the continental United States occurred on Feb. 26, 1979, nearly four decades ago. The last solar eclipse with totality visible across the continental U.S. occurred 99 years ago.

Totality covers a 70-mile-wide path, making landfall on the northern Oregon coast at about 10:15 a.m. PDT and moving offshore in South Carolina at 2:48 p.m. EDT. The longest duration of totality will be 2 minutes 40.2 seconds in southern Illinois, near Carbondale.

The beginning of the eclipse, called “first contact,” starts more than an hour before totality when the moon’s edge first appears to touch the sun’s edge. “Second contact” occurs when the moon just covers the sun, which lasts until the sun begins to uncover at “third contact.” At “fourth contact,” the last portion of the sun is uncovered, and the eclipse is over.

To see if your location will be in the path of totality, important safety information and much more, visit eclipse2017.nasa.gov.

Don’t despair if you’re not in the path of totality. The continental U.S. will see at least a 55 percent eclipse, which is an experience you’ll always remember.

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Star calendar July 2017

Star calendar July 2017

1 Jul    Jupiter is less than 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right at sunset. Spica is 3 finger-widths to the lower left. Arcturus is 2½ fist-widths above the moon.

3 Jul    Earth is at aphelion, 1.01668 AU from the sun.

5 Jul    At dusk, Antares is less than 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower right, and Saturn is a little more than 1 fist-width to the lower left.

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Claude “Skip” Wharton

Claude “Skip” Wharton, AP, was born Oct. 8, 1947, in Mount Clemons, Michigan, son of the late Claude Arthur Wharton Jr. and Lucille Keats Wharton. He was a retired director of business operations for the Applied Research and Development Institute of the South Carolina Research Authority. Skip was a Citadel graduate, Class of 1969, and was a captain in the U.S. Army. He served in Vietnam where he was the recipient of the Silver Star for gallantry in action. His various organizations included membership in The Citadel Alumni Association, life member of American Legion post 0172, 11th Armored Cavalry Regiment Veterans of Vietnam and Cambodia Life Member, 14th Armored Cavalry Regiment Association Life Member, and a member of the VFW Member-at-large of South Carolina.

Skip is survived by his wife, Patricia Wharton; son, Jeremy Wharton, of St. Petersburg, Florida; daughter, Mollie Dadin (husband Brian); beloved granddaughters, Aila and Eliza Dadin, of Charleston, South Carolina; and sister, Tootie Owens (husband James) and her family of Richmond, Virginia.

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Reliefband

Reliefband helps ease motion sickness

By Debbie Yeagle

Growing up, I was the little kid, green at the gills, crying at the Illinois State Fair. While the rest of my family rode the rides, I stood still, usually facing away from anything that moved. I suffer from vertigo and motion sickness. I never know when it will strike, and it can be quite awful.

I have tried everything: protein loading; ginger; pills of all kinds; getting up certain ways; lying down other ways; stretchy, tight elastic wristlets; and other well-intended suggestions from folks who have never suffered from motion sickness.

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Boaters answer distress call

Boaters answer distress call on Lake Mohave

By Andy Pensavalle

Phoenix Sail & Power Squadron members met at Lake Mohave for a weekly get-together on a beautiful day with clear skies and no wind. The summer crowds had disappeared, and although the lake had dropped and some beaches were mud bogs, everyone had enough flat warm sand to set up chairs. A series of fast sequential horn blasts interrupted our quiet respite. An island obscured our view of the main lake. After moving her vantage point, Barb Accardo saw smoke coming from a runabout dead in the water in the middle of the lake.

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La Isla Bonita

Sailors recall trip to Canary Islands

By Howard and Judy Wang

The night before Laelia’s departure from Santa Cruz de la Palma, Canary Islands, off Africa’s west coast, everything is calm and quiet except for the clanking and clacking of dock hardware and the groaning of boat and lines. The overcast sky reveals no stars or moon, and the humid wind nearly drips with moisture.

Well-provisioned, Laelia sits low in the water, showing little waterline. With water tanks and fuel tanks at the full mark, the boat stands ready for the 20- to 25-day, 2,800-nautical-mile sail across the Atlantic to the Caribbean.

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Star calendar June 2017

Star calendar June 2017

1 Jun     The first-quarter moon lies between magnitude 1.4 Regulus, 2 fist-widths to the right, and magnitude -2.2 Jupiter, 2½ fist-widths to the lower left.

2 Jun     Tonight Jupiter is 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower left.

3 Jun     The moon passes less than 1 finger-width to Jupiter’s upper left tonight. The bright star 1 fist-width to the moon’s lower left is magnitude 1.0 Spica.

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