Doc on Deck

Preparing for, implementing crew overboard recovery

Doc on Deck

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D. 

For the last 10 years, most authorities have agreed on the main principles in preparing for, and implementing, a crew overboard recovery. The five phases of recovery are

  • establish and maintain visual contact,
  • provide flotation immediately,
  • stop the boat as soon as possible,
  • maneuver to approach the victim, and
  • effect recovery over the side.
  • All five should be done as quickly as possible.

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Carbon monoxide poisoning: Recognizing, preventing the invisible killer

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D.

Whether you own a powerboat or sailboat or just drive a car, you should be aware of the dangers of carbon monoxide poisoning and know how to detect and treat it.

Silent, odorless, invisible and deadly

Difficult to detect, carbon monoxide is a colorless, odorless, tasteless gas that’s heavier than air. It’s made whenever carbon-based fuels are burned, such as in internal combustion engines like gasoline-powered generators and car and boat engines. Although diesel-fueled engines produce CO in smaller concentrations than gasoline engines, they still produce enough to be dangerous.

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Treating hypothermia image of snow and thermometer

Treating hypothermia

The hazards of exposure to cold on board, part 2

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D

In the last article, I discussed localized cold exposure syndromes in which a specific body part becomes cold but the rest of the body remains warmer. This article discusses generalized cold exposure, hypothermia, caused by a drop in the body’s core temperature.

Both localized and generalized cold exposure syndromes can exist in a patient at the same time, but treatment is quite different: Localized cold exposure is treated with immediate re-warming, while hypothermia must be slowly reversed.

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