Sailing the Door Peninsula

Sailing the Door Peninsula

By Dan Balch

We set sail on Lanikai for our annual cruise around the Door Peninsula late last August. Lanikai, a 1969 Pearson 300 sloop, was originally purchased by my parents, who sailed it 25,000 miles before shipping it to me 20 years ago. The sturdy boat sleeps three to four crew easily.

Its four-cylinder diesel engine was installed in 1995. Lanikai (Hawaiian for “beautiful sea”) displaces 10,000 pounds with 3,800 pounds of ballast, is 30 feet long, has a 9-foot beam, and draws 3½ feet. Our crew consisted of my son Richard, my brother Michael from Iowa, and me. My first mate, Bonnie, declined to join us.

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George Doerner

George H. Doerner died on Friday, November 15, 2019. His daughter Christa and her husband David were with him at Northwest Community Hospital, Arlington Heights, IL. He was born on March 26, 1936, to George A. and Viola (Shunneson) Doerner. He married Bridget (Bette) Keating on July 20, 1957.

George Doerner

George Doerner

He was an Electrician for IBEW Local 134. He volunteered as Police Reserve in Des Plaines, IL. He was a member of the Loyal Order the Moose for over 50 years. He was past commander and a Life Member of the Skokie Valley Sail & Power Squadron. He remembered many good times with his friends from Elmwood Park and the Skokie Valley Sail & Power Squadron. He was preceded in death by his parents and his sister June Soyer (Louis). He is survived by his devoted wife Bridget. Survivors also include daughter Christa (David) Hanson and son George A. Doerner: five grandchildren and five great-grandchildren, his sister-in-law Andrea Lenberg, his brother-in-law Thomas (Carole) Keating.

In lieu of flowers please make donations to the Lenberg Health Fund to support music and art therapy for residents of St. Coletta of Wisconsin. Attn: Development Office, N 4637 Co. Road Y, Jefferson, WI 53549 (www.stcolletawi.org).

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DIY bird deterrent

DIY bird deterrent for your boat

By Dave Osmolski and Doug Carlson

This time I’m sharing a project developed by friend and fellow Charlotte Power Squadron member Doug Carlson. Doug and I often get together for breakfast at a local diner, where the conversation usually turns to the subject of how we should use our boats more often but can never seem to find the time.

One of the problems with leaving a boat at the dock is that many different birds, mostly big birds, use it as a rest stop and leave their “calling cards.” In addition to being an unhealthy problem, bird guano can harm the gelcoat, upholstery and other fabrics. Some birds have hard shells from small mollusks and crustaceans in their droppings, which can do serious abrasive damage to the gelcoat.

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Alcohol and safety risks on board

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D.

According to the U.S. Coast Guard’s 2017 Recreational Boating Statistics, 658 people died from recreational boating accidents.

Alcohol use was the leading known contributing factor in fatal boating accidents. Where the cause of death was known, alcohol was listed as the leading factor in 19% of deaths.

Even moderate alcohol consumption substantially increases the risk of drowning, and consuming larger amounts of alcohol increases the risk of drowning 30 to 50 times more than that of someone who has not been drinking.

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Taming the winds and seas

Use a bridle

Have you been in an anchorage where the wind keeps the boat at odds with the waves, rolling your boat from side to side, making you uncomfortable and nauseated? Some people deploy flopper stoppers on each side to slow down this motion, but you have to store them somewhere, and they take quite a bit of effort to deploy.

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Are you ready to hit the waves?

Traveling by boat is not always smooth sailing. If we’re not properly prepared, the waterways around us can wreak havoc with the boat and people aboard. Before you leave the dock, take a close look at the inside and outside of your vessel.

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Woman to Woman

Lessons learned while docking

By Capt. Kathrine Redmond

In my next few articles, I’ll share information as though you have just completed your boating safety class and are gathering on-land, theoretical knowledge of the docking process.

In my previous column, I mentioned that the helmsperson must stop the movement of the boat in the slip so that the line handler can step off the boat, not jump off. Over the years, I have seen line handlers suffer broken and sprained ankles and have seen them fall into the water when skippers come into the slip too quickly and line handlers attempt to stop the boat by jumping onto the dock to tie a line. This practice is dangerous. The helmsperson’s job is to stop the movement of the boat in the slip!Read More

Mljet

Chartering along Southern Croatia

By Walter LaMendola with Bruce Cochran, Michelle Denton, Pam McCain, Charley Oliver and Nancy VanDeMark

“Why?” I’d wondered when Nancy told me that our group of sailor friends wanted to go to Croatia on holiday. I only had half-formed notions about Croatia and its people, but I should have known the “why” was typical sailor stuff.

The reasons included a long archipelago of sparsely inhabited Mediterranean islands; miles of beach, rock, vineyards, forest, palm trees, farms and olive groves; the southern Adriatic’s clear waters; and the generous people sustained by its riches. Mostly, it had to do with history and sailing with sun, wind and stars.

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Priscilla “Polly” Jones Woods

Priscilla “Polly” Jones Woods of Westbrook, Connecticut, died peacefully on Saturday, July 27, with family by her side. Polly was born on Valentine’s Day in 1930 and was the beloved wife of her husband Robert Woods for 70 years. She graduated from New Britain High School in 1947 and attended Wheelock College in Boston. As a swimming instructor she was a pioneer in teaching swimming to those with special needs and also teaching infants to swim. She had a lifetime association with the YMCA and was a Water Safety Instructor and a Master Swimmer. Polly taught a Water Aerobics Class at Essex Meadows and worked extensively with Sarah Inc., which helps families raising children and adult family members with intellectual disabilities, developmental disabilities or special healthcare needs. Providing them with coaching, assistance and encouragement, she brought joy and smiles of success to her students in the water, many of whom had difficulties on land. She also was a volunteer at Red Cross Blood Drives. She and Bob were very active members of America’s Boating Club with Polly rising to the rank of District 1 Lieutenant Commander. Polly loved swimming, boating, and the beach and passed that love on to her whole family. Her caring and giving ways will be forever missed.

Polly Woods

Polly Woods

Polly met the love of her life one summer at Grove Beach Point in Westbrook. That romance, which started as teenagers, lasted over 70 years. She married Bob when he was serving in the Army during the Korean War. They settled in Plainville where the raised their four children together, but still summered at Grove Beach Point or on their boat.

She is survived by her husband Robert Woods of Westbrook, her two sisters Natalie Neri of Niantic and Constance Peck of Madison. Her daughter Dianne Bronkie of East Berlin, her son Gary Woods and his wife Shelley of Deep River, Laura Woods of Westbrook, and Gail Sartori of Burlington, Ct. Polly’s grandchildren who she loved dearly are Jenifer Mongillo and her husband Jeff, Myshel Enman and her husband Garrett, Jaime Petillo and her husband Jeff, Jessica Sartori, Nick Sartori and his wife Jacilyn. The Great Grandchildren who will be missing her are Addison, Rocco, Ryan, Anna, Joseph, Dominic and Calina. And of course, her two beautiful Golden Retrievers Kate and Cooper, who were always by her side.

She is pre-deceased by her sister Barbara Jones Kellam and her loving parents Milton and Edith Jones of New Britain. A special thank you to everyone at The Shoreline of Clinton for the loving and compassionate care they bestowed on Polly.

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Emergency room afloat, part 2

The day sailor’s first-aid kit


By Gino Bottino, M.D.

In the last issue, we discussed “time to professional medical help” as the single most important variable in determining the extent of medical supplies and training needed aboard.

Accordingly, we divided the theoretical “complete medical chest” into smaller kits based on boating needs. The simplest of these is the day or deck kit, where medical help is available in less than 30 minutes.

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Woman to Woman

Develop your docking muscles

By Katherine Redmond

In my next few articles, I’ll share information as though you have just completed your boating safety class and are gathering on-land, theoretical knowledge of the docking process.

Most boaters would agree that docking a boat is the most difficult maneuver in the sport. It’s amazing to watch adventurers who have crossed oceans become uncomfortable when docking their vessels. If we are to become proficient at docking, we should learn all that we can about the task through on-land lessons and on-the-water skill drills.

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Kill Switch

Must-have devices that could save your life

By Dave Osmolski

I have just returned home after spending a few weeks at my “homemade tropical paradise” in Flamingo Bay, Florida, where I can boat, fish, swim and enjoy some of the best shelling in the U.S. I keep my boat in my backyard, so I can be off and running in a jiffy.

During this trip, I learned of a boater who died in an avoidable boating accident, the second boating accident fatality in the area in a few years. Both fatalities could have been avoided had the proper safety procedures been followed.

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