Exploring the overlooked anchorage of Polkinghorne Islands

By Steve Lorimer

On several trips to northern British Columbia or southeastern Alaska, I’d noticed the Polkinghorne Islands just west of Wells Passage. We’d passed these islands in deep fog without seeing them a number of times, but in summer 2016 I vowed that it was time for a visit.

None of the guidebooks mentioned the islands as a safe anchorage, but when talking with Billy Proctor, an old-time commercial fisherman, environmentalist and year-round resident of Echo Bay, he mentioned anchoring there while salmon fishing in nearby waters. That did it! He had confirmed what I had speculated, and as we left Sullivan Bay in the Broughton Islands, we headed for the Polkinghornes.

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Emergency room afloat

The medical kit and  the conscientious boater, Part I

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D.

The realization

When I started this column, I wanted to write about putting together a complete medical kit. The more I thought about the idea, the more I realized how complicated the task would be.

First, you have to keep the size manageable while making it reasonably complete. This becomes difficult when you consider that everyone boats in different venues, at different times of the year and in different climates with different groups of people, all of whom have individual needs.

After much consideration, I broke the topic into two segments: on-board medical kits for groups with an organizer and staff, and kits for those traveling alone.

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Woman to Woman

Harrowing docking experience

By Capt. Katherine Redmond

My favorite story revolves around an experience my husband and I had while travelling on the Intracoastal Waterway in our first powerboat during our first live-aboard experience. (We had previously been sailors.) Having no experience with powerboats and after spending three weeks in a V-berth on our friend’s sailboat, we bought what should have been a houseboat. It had a full-size refrigerator and stove and a large bathtub! It also had a single inboard engine (which, in my opinion, is the most difficult to control, especially in reverse), a shallow keel, and was so top-heavy that a sneeze could cause its 46-foot frame to heel precariously.

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DIY trailering device

DIY trailering device makes hitching easy

By Dave Osmolski

Boating is back in full swing! That means hitching up the trailer and taking the boat to the launch ramp. Sometimes hitching up the trailer isn’t all that happens. I have completely redecorated my vehicle’s license plate while hitching up my trailer. When I had a tow vehicle with a steel bumper, this didn’t bother me so much. The unique license plate helped me positively identify my vehicle in large parking lots. I have a plastic bumper now, and those near misses don’t enhance the resale value of my vehicle so much.

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Ontario's North Channel

Friends take a charter of Ontario’s North Channel

By Jerry Major

After several years of enjoyable sailing trips to Ontario’s North Channel aboard Major Dad II, my 26-year-old 27-foot O’Day 272, my fascination with the surrounding natural beauty and serenity has not diminished. However, my cruising buddies, brothers Steve and Howard Anderson, and I discovered an exciting alternative to sailing my boat on the long trek from Toledo Beach Marina on Lake Erie near Monroe, Michigan, to Manitoulin Island in the North Channel.

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Sailors tow stranded boat to safety

Sailors tow stranded boat to safety

By Evy Dudey, with help from Mark Glidden

After a grueling week of family emergencies, my husband, Mark, and I decided to go out on a Sunday for a late afternoon sail to enjoy the summer weather and have some time to ourselves. Along with our little dog Sprout, we boarded our 1970 27-foot Coronado sailboat, BRSRK, and headed south out of Everett’s central marina in the Snohomish River, with Jetty Island to our west. Because of the time of day, everyone else was headed back into the marina. I remarked to Mark, “Looks like the fleet is coming in!”

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Charles Rodney Ramsey

After a lengthy battle with colon cancer, Charles Rodney Ramsey lost his fight on September 7, 2018. Born on July 26, 1954 to Clyde and Alexandria Ward Ramsey, he was the youngest of four children. Charles had a great love of fishing and boating. He built his own houseboat, Cheap-N-Easy and loved riding on the Ouachita River. Charles loved the water. He traveled by cruise to the Bahamas, Mexico, and Alaska and by RV finding lakes, ponds, rivers, and waterfalls.

Charles was a member of the Ouachita Sail & Power Squadron for over 31 years and taught boating safety classes. He loved the boating friends that he made through this organization. Charles is survived by his wife of 27 years, Charlotte Langston Ramsey, his son, Alex Ramsey, his special boating buddy-his dog, Loki, and by all his boating friends. Lt/C Charlotte Ramsey, S

Charles Rodney Ramsey

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Albert “Buddy” E. Krise

Albert “Buddy” E Krise III, 82, passed away on Dec. 22, 2018. Buddy was a Norfolk native and raised in Colonial Place, where he spent his time boating on the Lafayette River. He was a graduate of Augusta Military Academy. He retired from ET Gresham after 30-plus years of service. Buddy was an avid boater whether it be power or sail; he loved being on the water. He was an active member of the United States Power Squadron since Dec. 9, 1957, Tidewater Boat Club, the Nansemond River Power Squadron, Hampton One Design Racing Association, and the now former Great Bridge Cruise Club.

Albert Krise III

He was predeceased by his parents Ellsworth Krise and Lanier Grubbs Krise, and by his wife Sandra A Krise. Buddy is survived by his children John Krise (Cheryl), Shryl Krise Jones (Shannon) and Linda Barnes (Mark); grandchildren Terry, Kathleen, Olivia, Ashley and Haley; and five great-grandchildren and sister Christina Gray. –Mark E. Barnes

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Photo of hole in fuel tank caused by galvanic corrosion

Diesel fuel tank repair

By Reid Gantt

Would you believe that a stainless steel washer could cause an estimated $20,000 in damage to your boat? That was an estimate given to remove and repair my diesel fuel tank.

Earlier this year, my wife, Karen, and I were on our 1983 twin diesel Atlantic 30 in Sneads Ferry, North Carolina, when I saw a sheen of diesel on the water. Further investigation revealed a leak in the port fuel tank.

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Curate the perfect toolkit

By Dave Osmolski

I took the USPS elective course Engine Maintenance ages ago, well before the advent of computer-controlled fuel injection and the other amazing advances in outboard engine manufacture in the past 20 years.

While these advances have taken away some of our ability to tinker with our outboards in the shade of a backyard tree, they have given us cleaner, quieter, more economical and longer-lasting engines than we had in “the good old days.”

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Cold and flu season

By Gino C. Bottino, M.D.

Winter is here, and with it comes cold and flu season. In the United States, more days of work (and probably play) are lost to colds and flu than any other illness. According to CDC estimates, the flu has caused between 140,000 and 710,000 hospitalizations and between 12,000 and 56,000 deaths each year since 2010. The common cold is even more pervasive with millions of cases being reported in the U.S. each year. Adults average two to three colds per year, and children have even more.

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